Kaminashi eliminates paperwork and digitalizes field workers’ work using a no-code solution.

Check Out LAUNCHPAD 2020 Winner Kaminashi’s Brilliant Pitch Deck

Check Out LAUNCHPAD 2020 Winner Kaminashi’s Brilliant Pitch Deck

IVS’ pitch competition LAUNCHPAD was founded in 2007 with the intent to give startups a platform that could catapult their businesses to the next level, and since then, about 400 startups have stood on the LAUNCHPAD stage. Among them, some all-stars have emerged, such as WealthNavi, MoneyForward, Crowdworks, Wantedly, and Bengo4 — many of which are now part of our portfolio. One such all-star is none other than software company, freee K.K, which listed on the Mothers Section of Tokyo Stock Exchange on December 17, 2019.

This article is the third of its series, where the first one took a look at the deck that freee used to win IVS LAUNCHPAD 2013 and the second one looked at IVS LAUNCHPAD 2017 winner, ecbo. This time, with Kaminashi’s assistance and permission, we are sharing with the public the presentation materials that they used to win LAUNCHPAD SaaS in 2020. Kaminashi eliminates paperwork and digitalizes field workers’ work using no-code solution.

Our comments: One thing the winners of IVS all have in common is excellent word choice on their first slide. The “digitalize” and “work on-site” give the audience some idea on what they do, while the “no-coding” makes it more interesting.

This is originally a video, but we did not include it in this article.

This is originally a video, but we did not include it in this article.

This is originally a video, but we did not include it in this article.

This is originally a video, but we did not include it in this article.

Our comments:While the 2017 winner ecbo used lots of high-resolution photos, Kaminashi uses plenty of well-envisioned videos. As there are more and more resources that allow you to create high-quality videos, it might be a good idea for founders consider this route when demonstrating their product. Kaminashi enlisted the help of some of their users to demonstrate the efficiency of their product.

Our comments:There are instances, like these two slides here, where photographs are the better medium to showcase a point than a video. This slide is pointing out all the human mistakes on this paper document.

This is originally a video, but we did not include it in this article.

This is originally a video, but we did not include it in this article.

Our comments:Illustrating the complicated workflow and the pain points of the audience helps investors understand the frustrations that Kaminashi is working to solve. The attention-grabbing design in this slide separates the problem from the solution.

This is originally a video, but we did not include it in this article.

This is originally a video, but we did not include it in this article.

This is originally a video, but we did not include it in this article.

This is originally a video, but we did not include it in this article.

This is originally a video, but we did not include it in this article.

This is originally a video, but we did not include it in this article.

Our comments:While having a demo video of the product itself is very important, showing how the users are utilizing the product, on what devices and at what kind of environment, might be even more impactful.

Our comments:When showing traction, most presentations go straight to number of clients or revenue, but for a new startup, a better way could be to show how the product has helped its clients to improve performance. Kaminashi does this in this slide.

Our comments: Growth rate and retention rate are important for sure. However, especially for early stage SaaS startups, it is important to show off your product’s frequency of use. It speaks to the value-add that users find in your product.

This is originally a video, but we did not include it in this article.

This is originally a video, but we did not include it in this article.

Our comments:Just like how there was a slide to separate the problem section and the solution section, it is audience-friendly to include an obvious slide to separate the current business and the future vision.

Our comments:It’s great to share your future vision, but it would be even better if you do what these several slides do, which is sharing where you are positioned at now, where you are heading to, and why you are in a good position to get there.

Our comments:On the left hand side of this photo is the founder of Kaminashi, Morooka-san. During this slide, Morooka-san talked about his four years work in the industry and experiencing the inefficiencies first hand. He also talked about how those four years compelled him to found Kaminashi, in order to address the pain points in the industry. A great way to end a presentation is by sharing your personal passion.

  • This article was translated from Japanese.